Target Zero Waste: We’re Doing Our Bit

In June 2010, the Scottish Government announced an ambitious zero waste strategy in a bid to radically lower the waste produced by businesses and households in Scotland.

The strategy aims to reach some challenging targets by 2025, including:
– recycling 70% of all waste
– ensuring a maximum 5% of all waste is sent to landfill.

Here at Regency, we’ve been doing our bit for many years, through our own responsible approaches to disposal of waste and the segregation of differing waste types to allow efficient recycling. While most local authoities have applied waste segregation to household waste only in recent years, we’ve seen the requirement for this in commercial waste handling for many years and have built good working relationships with local charitable organisations and recycling specialists to ensure that we have a route to reduce, reuse and recycle as we are all encouraged to do.

You may have read our page on house clearances. This is a good example of where our waste reduction approach comes to the fore. When we’re asked to clear a property, irrespective of the type of property, we do so with a view to minimising the amount of waste that results. If we are disposing of furniture for example, we take the time to assess each piece and understand if it can still be used, and whether someone else might benefit from it.

Reusing items is a big factor in reducing waste and just because one person no longer has a use for items, it doesn’t mean the item is of no use. Even though recycling is a popular route, reusing avoids the need to handle the items as waste, and place them in the energy-hungry recycling chain in the first place.

That’s where our relationships with third sector organisations come in useful. There are always people who can use furniture for example, if we can only get it to them.

We’ve also noticed that the cost of disposing of waste is rising. As a commercially-licenced waste carrier, we know that disposing of large amounts of waste is an expensive business and so the reduce, reuse, recycle mantra is taken seriously by all our staff. It makes great business sense, as well as environmental sense.

Are you doing your bit to reduce waste and meet the zero waste targets?

Body Fluids and Health Hazards – What You Need to Know

Cleaning body fluids is a hazardous activity, but a necessary one. Body fluids can present a range of hazards that need to be considered when you encounter them, and these hazards dictate the processes we use and the precautions we need to take.

Over the years, we’ve been involved in a number of biorecovery jobs that have involved cleaning up a range of body fluids and performing needle sweeps to ensure properties are safe to both clean and occupy.

The most common body fluids we encounter are blood, faeces, urine, saliva and vomit. All of these are deeply unpleasant for our operators but we always remain professional and handle each situation carefully and methodically. Each of these body fluids and secretions has the potential to harm people and animals either through the spread of infection or exposure to bacteria, and so they need to be cleaned quickly and efficiently, with thorough decontamination taking place.

You need to be aware, even before you call a specialist like Regency, that body fluids pose a significant health hazard. Blood is still the single-most frequent source of exposure to bloodborne pathogens and viruses like HIV and Hepatitis-C. If you have a blood spillage, take care not allow anyone to come into contact with the blood and seek specialist advice immediately. Equally, if you believe there is a risk of encountering used hypodermic needles, you should be aware that these pose the same risk, since they can be contaminated with bloodborne pathogens, and require professional disposal. If you encounter needles, clear the area and control access by people and animals as far as possible, before calling for professional help.

Needle sweeping is a particular skill, with specific processes and approaches employed to keep staff and members of the public safe, and avoid needlestick injuries that can lead to infection.

You might think that other body fluids don’t pose as much of a hazard as blood, but you would be wrong. Faeces, urine, saliva and vomit all carry a risk of exposure to bacteria that could result in serious illness, as well as the transmission of virus and disease.